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Internal Medicine CPD with the Webinar Vet  - £0.00 Listing ID: 2650



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Listing Began: Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Description

Further information:

Below are just some of the webinars available to our members or can be purchased individually

For more information on our courses and membership please visit our shopfront

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Hypercalcaemia

Mike Herrtage

Mike Herrtage will discuss hypercalcaemia. Mike Herrtage graduated from the Liverpool University and is currently Professor of Small Animal Medicine. He is Dean of the CambridgeVeterinarySchool and is in charge of the small animal medicine and diagnostic imaging services at the Queen’s VeterinarySchoolHospital. He was awarded the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (B.S.A.V.A.) Woodrow Award in 1986 for outstanding contributions in the field of small animal veterinary medicine and the B.S.A.V.A. Blaine Award for outstanding contributions to the advancement of small animal medicine in 2000.

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Obesity Management

Valerie Parker

Dr. Parker is on faculty at The Ohio State University where she is responsible for clinical and didactic teaching in the fields of Small Animal Internal Medicine and Nutrition. Her research areas of interest involve nutritional management of kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease and idiopathic hypercalcemia.

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Treatment of IMHA & ITP – A Review of Common Immunomodulatory Therapies

Christopher G. Byers

Dr. Byers grew up in the small seacoast town of Rochester, New Hampshire. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Sciences from Colorado State University, and graduated as a University Honors Scholar. He earned his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Cornell University. He is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC) and the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) in small animal internal medicine (SAIM). Dr. Byers is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor of Emergency and Critical Care at Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in Manhattan, Kansas. He serves as a consultant in emergency medicine for the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), and is a member of the Board/Council of Regents for both the ACVECC and ACVIM. He also serves as an At-Large Board Member for the Nebraska Academy of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Byers’ commitment to elevate the care for companion animals is evidenced by that fact that he has published several textbook chapters and scientific papers in various peer-reviewed journals. He also co-authored the textbook, Handbook of Veterinary Emergency Protocols: Dog and Cat. Dr. Byers also enjoys clinical research, and his current areas of interest include immune-mediated diseases and abdominal compartment syndrome.

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Pathophysiology & Diagnosis of IMHA & ITP

Christopher G. Byers

Dr. Byers grew up in the small seacoast town of Rochester, New Hampshire. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Sciences from Colorado State University, and graduated as a University Honors Scholar. He earned his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Cornell University. He is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC) and the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) in small animal internal medicine (SAIM).

Dr. Byers is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor of Emergency and Critical Care at Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in Manhattan, Kansas. He serves as a consultant in emergency medicine for the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), and is a member of the Board/Council of Regents for both the ACVECC and ACVIM. He also serves as an At-Large Board Member for the Nebraska Academy of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Byers’ commitment to elevate the care for companion animals is evidenced by that fact that he has published several textbook chapters and scientific papers in various peer-reviewed journals. He also co-authored the textbook, Handbook of Veterinary Emergency Protocols: Dog and Cat. Dr. Byers also enjoys clinical research, and his current areas of interest include immune-mediated diseases and abdominal compartment syndrome.

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Ketoacidosis in dogs

Mike Herrtage

Mike Herrtage will discuss Ketoacidosis in dogs.

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Breathing difficulties in dogs; Coughing, dyspnoea and tachypnoea

Kate Murphy

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Feline Hyperthyroidism; (Non-surgical) evidence-based medicine, possible aetiology and prevention

Andrew Bodey

Although thyroid nodules have been observed since 1964, feline hyperthyroidism was first reported as recently as 1979. Since then the incidence has only increased, becoming the commonest endocrine disorder in older cats. It is estimated that there are in the region of 100,000 cases in the UK. The well-known clinical presentation of weight loss despite polyphagia, tachycardia and palpable goitre, together with helpful laboratory tests, makes it usually (but not always) a straightforward diagnosis, and cases are now often detected at earlier stages in the disease process. A recent survey has shown a reported incidence of at least 20% amongst cats in Ireland in 2013.

This webinar does not discuss the clinical condition, or diagnosis, or treatment doses. Instead it reviews current thinking on possible aetiology, with consideration of dietary factors, potential thyroid disrupters and other associations that have been described repeatedly in epidemiological surveys. Based on this current understanding, possible prevention strategies are described as currently recommended in the USA. Whilst recognising that there is no certainty that following these strategies will affect disease incidence, they are logical in attempting to reduce feline exposure to potentially avoidable risk factors. This opportunity to perhaps positively influence disease risk is likely to be of interest to the most committed cat-owning clients, particularly those with previous or current experience of feline hyperthyroidism.

In the context of this increasing disease incidence, the second half of the webinar reviews papers looking at the client experience of medicating (orally and transdermally) and using iodine-restricted diet, and clinical outcomes for methimazole, iodine-restricted diet and radioiodine. Outcome data include control of hyperthyroidism, and, where available, client perception and patient life expectancy. Although a number of treatment options are available, the most appropriate treatment will vary between patients. It is hoped that this overview will facilitate evidence-based medicine when choosing treatment strategies, relevant for the general practitioner for whom this is a frequent diagnosis.

Andrew Bodey qualified from Bristol in 1989, and spent 2 years in mixed practice in Staffordshire before moving to companion animals in the south east. In 1995 he joined Bishopton Veterinary Group in Ripon, obtaining his CertVR in 2003. From this he further developed his interest in ionizing radiation, and solved his frustration at having to refer hyperthyroid cats either to Glasgow or Newmarket by establishing the first radio-iodine unit in the North of England, in 2008. In the process he reduced the minimum hospitalization period in the UK to 2 weeks. In September 2013 he founded the Hyperthyroid Cat Centre, near Wetherby, providing radio-iodine treatment on a much larger scale, and further reduced the minimum hospitalization period to 7 days.  He also has a current active interest in clinical research, participating in the Clinical Research Outreach Program run by Dr Mark Holmes at Cambridge.

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Protein Losing Enteropathy due to Lymphangiectasia in Dogs

Jane Armstrong

This webinar will start with a summary of how the syndrome of protein-losing enteropathy is diagnosed in dogs, and what causes should be considered. One specific cause, lymphangiectasia, will be discussed in detail in regard to at-risk breeds, diagnosis and therapy. Recent information from a study on the disease in Yorkshire terrier dog will be available. Since lymphangiectasia usually occurs in combination with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this webinar will also recap current information on the diagnostic criteria and management of IBD.

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Dealing with cases of canine renal disease

Ian Ramsey

Canine renal disease is often seen in small animal practice, though it is not as frequent as in cats. The most common presentation is chronic renal failure but other renal diseases such as acute renal failure, protein losing nephropathies and renal tumours are also occasionally encountered. This webinar will take a case of each of these canine renal diseases and illustrate the diagnostic approach, prognosis and management options using an interactive format.

The cause of chronic renal disease is rarely identified but a large number of inflammatory, infectious, immune-mediated, iatrogenic (drug-induced), congenital, neoplastic and metabolic aetiolgies have been suggested. Chronic renal disease will progress even if the inciting cause is removed and the aim of treatment is to slow the rate of progression to allow the kidney’s own adaptions and repair processes time to act.

In contrast, in acute renal failure an underlying aetiology is often apparent. Common causes of acute renal failure include renal ischaemia or exposure to nephrotoxins (eg, NSAIDS, aminoglycosides, ethylene glycol).If these can be removed and effective therapy (rapidly) provided then the condition may be reversible.

Protein losing nephropathies are caused by specific conditions affecting the glomerulus and result in a distinct spectrum of clinical signs. Despite many cases being due to a suspected immune mediated glomerulonephritis, steroids are rarely effective and may actually worsen the situation.

Primary renal tumours are rare and tend to be associated with haematuria without azotaemia or significant hypoalbuminaemia. Surgery is the only effective treatment.

Ian Ramsey graduated from LiverpoolUniversity, obtained a PhD on feline leukaemia virus at GlasgowUniversity and then completed his residency at CambridgeUniversity where he was awarded the RCVS Diploma in Small Animal Medicine and the Diploma of the EuropeanCollege of Veterinary Internal Medicine. In 1998 Ian returned to GlasgowUniversity where he is now the Professor of Small Animal Medicine. Ian is the editor of the latest (7th) edition of the BSAVA Small Animal Formulary.

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Management of Dyspnoea

Mike Herrtage

Mike will discuss the management of dyspnoea.

Mike Herrtage graduated from the LiverpoolUniversity and is currently Professor of Small Animal Medicine. He is Dean of the CambridgeVeterinarySchool and is in charge of the small animal medicine and diagnostic imaging services at the Queen’s VeterinarySchoolHospital. He was awarded the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (B.S.A.V.A.) Woodrow Award in 1986 for outstanding contributions in the field of small animal veterinary medicine and the B.S.A.V.A. Blaine Award for outstanding contributions to the advancement of small animal medicine in 2000.

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Understanding lab tests in Chronic Kidney Disease

Nick Carmichael

The last 20 years have seen huge progress in the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease moving it from a condition with an almost inevitably poor outcome to something that can be managed long term whilst giving a good quality of life.

Central to this change has been the routine use of blood and urine tests.

Many of these tests appear very familiar but to optimise their diagnostic yield we need to understand exactly what they tell us and how they may be affected in renal disease and by other factors.

In addition, the use of clinical decision limits such as those defined within the recent IRIS guidelines to determine kidney disease stage and appropriate therapy challenge some of our conventional ideas about test result interpretation.

In this webinar Nick Carmichael will review the commonly used tests in renal disease, their interpretation and give some guidance for working with IRIS, building a comprehensive but cost- effective approach to monitoring these cases suitable for practice. On the way he will briefly discuss the pathophysiology behind the tests and share some practical tips to ensure the best results from samples analysed in practice or sent out to an external lab.

Nick Carmichael spent 10 years in a mixture of first and second opinion small animal practice before returning to his first love of veterinary pathology. He has worked as a clinical pathologist for over 20 years and is currently the veterinary director of CTDS, a diagnostic laboratory he established together with Dr Andy Torrance in 2004. The lab is one of only a handful in the UK accredited by the laboratory standards committee of the European College of Veterinary Clinical Pathology as a training laboratory for clinical pathologists. The lab provides diagnostic services to first opinion and second opinion practices across the UK and prides itself on the quality not only of the pathology but also on the level of service, contact and follow up with clinicians.

This is in line with Nick’s view that the role of the clinical pathologist is to act as bridge between the laboratory science and clinical practice ensuring we make the best possible use of the information we have for the benefit of the patient and their owners.

Nick enjoys and reports on all aspects of clinical pathology but has a special interest in neurology, haematology and clinical pathology in exotic species.

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The coughing dog

Theresa McCann

The talk will cover a brief overview of the pathophysiology of coughing followed by an in depth look at the diagnostic approach to the coughing dog. We will cover the indications and techniques for the various imaging modalities as well as bronchoscopy. Case based examples will be included.

Theresa initially studied inNew Zealandprior to moving to theUKand undertaking a residency in Small Animal Internal Medicine at the R(D)SVS inEdinburgh. After obtaining both an RCVS and European diploma she moved into private practice and has worked as an internal medicine clinician at Davies Veterinary Specialists for the past three years.

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Cutaneous Manifestions of Internal Disease

Prof Stephen White

Various diseases will be covered in both dogs and cats, such as internal neoplastic and metabolic conditions. These will include feline thymoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, nodular dermatofibrosis, and superficial necrolyitic dermatitis (SND) among others. The diagnostics and therapeutics will also be discussed. Endocrinopathies that result in skin changes will be reviewed.

 Dr. White has worked as a veterinary dermatologist for 3 decades, becoming a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology in 1983. A graduate of UC Davis, he did his internship and residency at Davis as well. He has held faculty positions at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine and Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, before joining the School of Veterinary Medicine at University of California at Davis as a full Professor in 1998. He has also been staff dermatologist at Angell Memorial Animal Hospital in Boston, twice a sabbatical professor at the Ecole National Vétérinaire de Nantes, France, and a Clinical Teaching Locum at the Atlantic Veterinary College on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Dr. White has lectured throughout the USA, Canada, Europe, and Asia. His areas of major interests include cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease, equine dermatology, rabbit/rodent dermatology, non-steroidal therapy of auto-immune disease, and congenital skin disease.

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Management of Obesity

Alex German

Alex German will deliver the second part of his obesity webinars.

Obesity is defined as an accumulation of excessive amounts of adipose tissue in the body; the disease predisposes to a variety of diseases including diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, and cardiorespiratory diseases.  In most animals, obesity is the result of a simple imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure.  This lecture will discuss current thoughts on management of obesity in dogs and cats.

Alex German is a graduate of Bristol University, and received his PhD from the same institution in 2000.  He is currently Royal Canin Senior Lecturer in Small Animal Medicine at the University of Liverpool.  His research interests include small animal gastroenterology and obesity biology.

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Causes and Consequences of Obesity

Alex German

Buy One Get One Free!

If you purchase this webinar you will also get the second webinar in this series on Obesity by Alex German which is on Thursday 29th November at 9pm FREE. Alex German will discuss the causes and consequences of obesity. This is the first of two webinars Alex will give on obesity. Obesity is defined as an accumulation of excessive amounts of adipose tissue in the body.  In humans, strict definitions of the degree of adiposity exist, and these are based upon epidemiological data.  Overweight cats and dogs are greater than 15% above their ideal weight, whilst the term obese’ is used when current weight is 30% above ideal.  Disease associations have been proven for companion animals that are both overweight and obese. Alex German is a graduate of Bristol University, and received his PhD from the same institution in 2000.  He is currently Royal Canin Senior Lecturer in Small Animal Medicine at the University of Liverpool.  His research interests include small animal gastroenterology and obesity biology.

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Shoulder lameness in the dog

Richard Whitelock

The diagnosis of shoulder lameness is rarely straightforward. Complicating factors include the interpretation of the dog’s response to manipulation, the overlying soft tissues and apparent “laxity” that is present in the normal joint. This presentation will guide you through the investigation of shoulder-related lameness from physical examination, survey radiography, arthrocentesis, arthrography and arthroscopy. Case studies will be used to illustrate the common conditions that lead to shoulder lameness.
Richard qualified in 1989 from the Royal Veterinary College, University of London. He spent 4 years in general practice before embarking on a route to specialisation in small animal surgery. After studying in the department of radiology at the Royal Veterinary College he was awarded the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons’ Diploma in Veterinary Radiology in 1994. Richard then took a 4 year surgical training position at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded the ECVS Diploma in Small Animal Surgery in 1997 and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons’ Diploma in Small Animal Surgery (Orthopaedics) in 1998. He has been an examiner for the diploma in surgery for both the ECVS and Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. Richard is head of the orthopaedic service at Davies Veterinary Specialists and past-President  and current Chair of the European College of Veterinary Surgeons.

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Class IV Laser Therapy – A New Field of Therapy for Vets and their Pets

Stephen Barabas

This webinar is aimed not at the physicist or biomedical scientist, but at the general veterinary practitioner and nurse. The aim is to give an overview of what, how and when Class IV laser therapy can be used to aid musculoskeletal and wound healing and pain management for domestic pets, exotics and equine patients in all UK veterinary practices. Presently over 6000 veterinary practices use the Class IV lasers in North American veterinary practices, with a greater number being used in human medical hospitals and rehabilitation centres. Not only will this webinar give you an insight into the science and clinical uses of the Class IV Laser but the impressive economic returns for your veterinary practice.

Stephen Barabas is a graduate of Glasgow University veterinary medicine and zoology faculties. Having worked in mixed practice in the west of England and North Wales he became involved in the 2001 FMD crisis and joined DEFRA in Cumbria helping contain the disease spreading throughout the country.

In 2002 he became the first Technical Manager of VetPlus Limited, a nutraceutical veterinary company based in Lancashire, England. In 2004 he joined Schering-Plough Animal Health UK, and within the year had been moved to their US headquarters in New Jersey, USA. Mr. Barabas was made the Chief Veterinary Officer for HomeAgain LLC, the largest animal-microchipping company in the world. During this time he became interested in using the internet and website to improve customer compliance.

He has set up Animal Oracle Limited a web development company specialising developing IT tools and websites for the pharmaceutical companies and vet practices in the UK and abroad, and in 2010 set up VBS Direct Ltd, a company aimed at providing innovative solutions to help veterinary surgeons and nurses in practice improve their offerings and range of therapies they can provide domestic pet owners. In 2011 VBS Direct started distributing the therapeutic K-Laser within the UK to medical hospitals and veterinary practices.

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Canine Pancreatitis

Prof Mike Willard

Prof Mike Willard will discuss canine pancreatitis.
Mike is a graduate of Texas A&M University. He did his internal medicine residency at Michigan State University and then held faculty appointments at Michigan State University, Mississippi State University, and now at Texas A&M University. He is a professor of Small Animal Clinical Science and specializes in gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreatology and endoscopy. He has given over 2,400 hours of post-graduate continuing education lectures and has over 80 refereed publications and 100 book chapters. He is a past Secretary of ACVIM and the Past President of the Comparative Gastroenterology Society. His interests are farming, walking, and playing chess (badly, but has fun anyway).

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PUPD

Professor Ian Ramsey

Ian Ramsey will discuss PUPD

Ian Ramsey graduated from Liverpool University, obtained a PhD on feline leukaemia virus at Glasgow University and then completed his residency at Cambridge University where he was awarded the RCVS Diploma in Small Animal Medicine and the Diploma of the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. In 1998 Ian returned to Glasgow University where he is now the Professor of Small Animal Medicine. Ian is the editor of the latest (7th) edition of the BSAVA Small Animal Formulary.

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Feline Hepatic Lipidosis

Dr Jane Armstrong

Dr Jane Armstrong will discuss Feline Hepatic Lipidosis.

 Dr. Jane Armstrong is a graduate of the Ontario Veterinary College in Canada.

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The Management of Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

Angie Hibbert BVSc CertSAM DipECVIM-CA MRCVS

Protexin Veterinary is pleased to present a webinar that will deliver case-based information on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of feline lower urinary tract disease.
Please enter the code UTD to discount the price to ZERO

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Cytology: Tips to Maximize Sample Quality & Applications in Telemedicine

Anne Lanevschi

Cytology is a frequently underused tool for a variety of reasons. Lack of time, poor sample quality (diagnostic failure) and insufficient training are most often cited as a cause for cytology to be used sparingly or altogether avoided. As a technique within the vet’s diagnostic toolkit, it is actually a lot simpler than some think: by taking some straight forward precautions, using a simplified sampling approach for lumps and bumps as well as internal organs, high sample cellularity can be ensured. And for those that have the interest, valuable information can be obtained from reviewing specimens in order to quickly orient diagnosis. By incorporating sampling tips, and with a little bit of experience gained over time from examining smears regularly, the first opinion veterinarian will be able to improve technique to ensure that specimens examined or referred are of high diagnostic quality. For those that wish to examine their own specimens, they will be able to diagnose a range of lesions and become better able over time to decide when to refer a specimen to a specialist. Classification of non inflammatory and inflammatory lesions will be explored, as well as how to assess malignancy and understand the common artefacts that one can come across during a cytological examination and which can hinder a diagnosis or perplex the untrained microscopist.
Several techniques and a dozen ‘special’ tips will be provided during this presentation for vets to maximise sample quality and learn the step-wise microscopic approach to examining a specimen. Finally, several case studies will illustrate referral of cytology as well as understand the positioning of cytology within telereferral during diagnostic and therapeutic work-up.

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Mycobacteria in cats

Professor Danièlle A. Gunn-Moore

Tuberculosis (TB) has recently become topical again. Most people have heard of TB in humans, cattle and badgers, and now people are talking about TB in cats. What we therefore need to know is does it occur, what sort of TB is it, and is it a risk to humans? Danièlle Gunn-Moore will discuss in great detail in this webinar.

Danièlle Gunn-Moore graduated with Distinction from the R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, in 1991. After a year in small animal practice she joined The Feline Centre, University of Bristol, initially as the Feline Advisory Bureau Scholar, then the Duphar Feline Fellow, and completed a PhD study into Feline Infectious Peritonitis in 1997. After a short period as Lecturer in Veterinary Pathology, University of Bristol, she returned to Edinburgh to establish the Feline Clinic. She is now Professor of Feline Medicine and Head of Companion Animal Sciences. She is interested in all aspects of feline medicine; she is an internationally recognised expert in her area, lectures extensively and her work has been published widely. In 2009 she was awarded the BSAVA Woodrow Award for outstanding contribution in the field of small animal veterinary medicine, and in 2011 she was awarded the International Society for Feline Medicine / Hill’s award for Outstanding Contributions to Feline Medicine. She shares her home with her husband Frank and two beautiful cats; a 13 year old Bengal girl called Teaninich and 7 year old Maine Coon boy called Mortlach (both named after Scottish single malt whiskies).

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Is there an Explosion in Colonic Diarrhoea?

David Murdoch

This discussion is based on the premise that there is an increase in the incidence of clinical problems related to the colon. The importance of the colon as a “storage organ”  and its role in fluid balance is crucial to production of normal faeces.

The discussion will be limited to chronic diarrhoea which can be defined as a diarrhoea that has been present for three weeks or longer. The initial approach is to attempt to localise the condition based on the appearance of the faeces which may allow the clinician to determine whether the clinical problem originates in the small or large intestine.

The most common lesion in the intestine of the dog is an increase in cellular infiltrates in the lamina propria which is one definition of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). This can affect both the small and large intestine and much of the current research is aimed a determining the underlying cause of IBD. An understanding of the mechanisms that allow the digestive system to classify the antigens presented to it as “friend” or “foe” is crucial to determining treatment strategies for IBD. Abnormalities of this immune tolerance have been implicated in the development of a wide range of GI problems including IBD, Food Allergy, Antibiotic Responsive Diarrhoea, Protein Losing Enteropathy and even Peri-anal Fistulae.

The use of molecular techniques analysing 16S bacterial rRNA have shown that large numbers of the intestinal bacterial flora cannot be cultivated by standard techniques. These new techniques combined with a greater understanding of intestinal immunology have led to a new perception of the role of bacteria in development oh chronic intestinal problems and whether this is a change in the composition of the intestinal flora or whether it reflects an abnormal host / flora interaction. Of even greater importance, is the discovery that these conditions may have a genetic basis based on investigation of the canine genome e.g. the role of mutated receptors in the German Shepherd Dog. The condition of Antibiotic Responsive Diarrhoea will be discussed in the light of these recent findings

A range of intestinal conditions like Cobalamin Deficiency, Protein Losing Enteropathy and Tritrichomonas in cats will be discussed as well as the problems involved in dietary and therapeutic management of IBD. This section involves current thoughts on Fibre-Responsive  Colitis and Granulomatous Colitis of Boxers.

Finally, the presentation will consider the proposal that Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects dogs as well as humans.

David worked as a lecturer in Internal Medicine in the Small Animal Departments of Glasgow and Liverpool Universities. For the last few years, he has been in Practice seeing both First Opinion and Referral cases in Gastro-Enterology and is a recipient of Blaine Award. He has lectured extensive in the UK and Europe and has contributed to several text books.

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Dealing with difficult diabetics

Professor Ian Ramsey

This webinar will focus on diabetic cats and dogs that present particular difficulties. These include diabetics that present with ketoacidosis, or those that have failed to stabilise despite reasonable efforts to get their condition under control.  Diabetes mellitus is occasionally presented with intercurrent diseases that may affect the management of the diabetes. In particular acromegaly is increasingly being recognised as a complicating factor, however hypeadrenocorticism, hypothyroidisim, and hyperthyroidisim will also be mentioned.

Case examples will be used to illustrate how investigations of unstable diabetics can lead to an improvement in the glycaemic control. Although this webinar follows on from “Diabetes melitus: from first consult to long term survival” given on December 1st 2011, the two presentation are entirely separate and can be viewed independently.

Ian Ramsey graduated from Liverpool University, obtained a PhD on feline leukaemia virus at Glasgow University and then completed his residency at Cambridge University where he was awarded the RCVS Diploma in Small Animal Medicine and the Diploma of the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. In 1998 Ian returned to Glasgow University where he is now the Professor of Small Animal Medicine. Ian is the editor of the latest (7th) edition of the BSAVA Small Animal Formulary.

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